The statue of the bloodiest dictator, Joseph Stalin, inaugurated in Novosibirsk, Russia CANAL3.MD

The statue of the bloodiest dictator, Joseph Stalin, inaugurated in Novosibirsk, Russia CANAL3.MD

After 20 years of controversy, the statue of the bloodiest dictator, Joseph Stalin, was inaugurated in Novosibirsk, Russia. The bust was revealed by the mayor of the city, Anatolii Lokoti, in the ears of dozens of citizens. Despite people's protests, it was raised on the territory of the local organization of the Communist Party of the Russian Federation.

During the ceremony, the mayor of Novosibirsk gave a speech in which he praised Stalin's regime. Even if the bust was installed on privately owned territory, the dictator's supporters fear that it could be vandalized at any time. & Nbsp; & nbsp;

"Discussions about this statue reach the limits of hysteria, and this fact is not good. In the city there is no place to install this bust. It is an offense," said Russian historian Konstantin Golodiaev.

"In my opinion, Stalin's millions are victims. He was not only a generalist and a victor, but he was at the base of that regime that killed millions of people and left consequences for others," said the civic activist from Russia, Timur Hanov.

At the order of the Soviet dictator, on the night of June 12 to 13, 1941, the first wave of deportations in Bessarabia and Northern Bukovina began. The second largest wave followed in July 1949. According to official data, following the "IUG" operation, over 35 thousand Moldovans were then taken to Siberia and northern Kazakhstan. Another 20 thousand were deported in the spring of 1951.